And finally:

cabinporn:

Cabin Porn, the book.
We’re happy to share that Cabin Porn – our labor of love – yielded a new creative opportunity for us. We’re making a full-color book about the cabins you built and shared with us. Little Brown will publish it.

AHH BEST COFFEE TABLE BOOK EVER I NEED THIS.

cabinporn:

Cabin Porn, the book.

We’re happy to share that Cabin Porn – our labor of love – yielded a new creative opportunity for us. We’re making a full-color book about the cabins you built and shared with us. Little Brown will publish it.

AHH BEST COFFEE TABLE BOOK EVER I NEED THIS.

jennydeluxe:

zafira66:
THIS! THIS! THiS! 

jennydeluxe:

zafira66:

THIS! THIS! THiS! 

I went to Troy, Missouri to report on the active shooter drills that are becoming more common in schools—complete with fake blood, real guns shooting blanks, “gunmen,” and law enforcement. Super-intense. I won’t lie, I was a little freaked out.

The internet reacted to this VERY strongly, which prompted me to write a follow-up about how psychologists feel about these drills (the ones I spoke with were not fans). I also went on Chris Hayes to talk about it:

The context of Troy itself ended up on the cutting room floor, but I think it’s important to mention that its transformation from rural town to suburb has correlated with its fear and heightened security. I spoke with a parent, Jim Ladlie, who grew up in this area back in the ‘70s, when there was only one blinking red stoplight in the middle of the town. He and his friends used to leave shotguns in the back of their cars so they could go trap-shooting after school.

He told me that “there was a lot more freedom” and “these shootings were the furthest thing from our minds.” His senior class had less than 200 kids, so “it wasn’t as hard to spot the kids with the issues.” Today, having a gun in the school’s parking lot is grounds for expulsion. Troy Buchanan now has secured entrances, security cameras, and magnets on their classroom doors. It’s hard not to notice that these school shootings—and these drills—are an overwhelmingly suburban phenomenon, seemingly spurred by the kind of anonymity, boredom, and isolation you don’t see as much in cities or tiny, tight-knit communities.

Seeing “9 to 5” on the big screen as an adult: DONE.

(Source: apricotedits)

"Who am I, a little black girl from Brooklyn, to think that I can do research at NASA?"

My latest for NBC News, on diversity (or lack thereof) in STEM fields.

Happier times.

(Source: jlasoulislive)

MEMORIEZ :(

(Source: takeabreaths, via stratfordbieber)

"

The organized left, which should have known better, acted as if the way to change American society was for each person individually to renounce the family, material comfort, and social respectability. That most people were doing no such thing was glibly attributed to sexual repression, greed, and/or “brainwashing” by the mass media—the implication being that radicals and bohemians were sexier, smarter, less corrupt, and generally more terrific than everyone else.

Actually, what they mostly were was younger and more privileged; it was easy to be a self-righteous antimaterialist if you had never known anxiety about money; easy to sneer at the security of marriage if you had solicitous middle-class parents; easy, if you were twenty years old and childless, to blame those parents for the ills of the world. Not that radicals were wrong in believing that a sexually free, communal society was incompatible with capitalism, or in perceiving connections between sexual repression, obsessive concern with material goods, and social conformity. But they did not understand that, psychology aside, most people submit to the power of institutions because they suffer unpleasant consequences if they don’t.

"

— #relevant (via ellenwillis)