"

Max Novick has known he’s wanted to be a filmmaker for years, ever since he saw “A Clockwork Orange” and “Fight Club.” Since then, he’s set about making this happen. His resume is four pages long, filled with dozens of jobs—production assistant, director of photography, script supervisor—on independent and student films in the New York area.

He’s also only 16 years old, a junior at Roslyn High School in Long Island. The “jobs” have been unpaid volunteer opportunities—in other words, internships. He’s been “aggressively seeking this stuff out” since middle school.

“I just think, ‘What am I waiting for?’” he said. “Now’s the perfect time because I’m not in college so I don’t have to worry about getting paid…I’m really kind of future oriented.”

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— Read more about high schoolers on their interning grind at Nbcnews.com. (P.S. Max Novick will be hiring us all in 10 years. Beware.)

This hand signal is why 15-year-old Dontadrian Bruce, a student and football player in Olive Branch, Miss., was suspended and faced expulsion. The district accused him of throwing up “gang signs.” He told me he was just repping his football jersey number.
Here’s my report for NBCNews.com; the 21-day ordeal this mild-mannered kid went through because of “zero tolerance” is pretty nutso.
Also: a local organization informed me on Twitter that not only had DeSoto county been sued for things like this before (which I mention in my piece), it had also been cited in a report criticizing school discipline. Sounds like it’s time for a few changes…

This hand signal is why 15-year-old Dontadrian Bruce, a student and football player in Olive Branch, Miss., was suspended and faced expulsion. The district accused him of throwing up “gang signs.” He told me he was just repping his football jersey number.

Here’s my report for NBCNews.com; the 21-day ordeal this mild-mannered kid went through because of “zero tolerance” is pretty nutso.

Also: a local organization informed me on Twitter that not only had DeSoto county been sued for things like this before (which I mention in my piece), it had also been cited in a report criticizing school discipline. Sounds like it’s time for a few changes…

T + L on my mind.

T + L on my mind.

(via antagonismoftruth-deactivated20)

"If you really want to remove barriers, abolish these tests."

I asked whether the new SAT—and its “free test prep for all”—will kill a billion-dollar industry and break down educational inequality. (Spoiler: nope!)

Iggy Azalea - Fancy ft. Charli XCX

Shameless pander to the Clueless Generation but I kiiiiind of loooove it.

(Source: alliggy)

And finally:

cabinporn:

Cabin Porn, the book.
We’re happy to share that Cabin Porn – our labor of love – yielded a new creative opportunity for us. We’re making a full-color book about the cabins you built and shared with us. Little Brown will publish it.

AHH BEST COFFEE TABLE BOOK EVER I NEED THIS.

cabinporn:

Cabin Porn, the book.

We’re happy to share that Cabin Porn – our labor of love – yielded a new creative opportunity for us. We’re making a full-color book about the cabins you built and shared with us. Little Brown will publish it.

AHH BEST COFFEE TABLE BOOK EVER I NEED THIS.

jennydeluxe:

zafira66:
THIS! THIS! THiS! 

jennydeluxe:

zafira66:

THIS! THIS! THiS! 

I went to Troy, Missouri to report on the active shooter drills that are becoming more common in schools—complete with fake blood, real guns shooting blanks, “gunmen,” and law enforcement. Super-intense. I won’t lie, I was a little freaked out.

The internet reacted to this VERY strongly, which prompted me to write a follow-up about how psychologists feel about these drills (the ones I spoke with were not fans). I also went on Chris Hayes to talk about it:

The context of Troy itself ended up on the cutting room floor, but I think it’s important to mention that its transformation from rural town to suburb has correlated with its fear and heightened security. I spoke with a parent, Jim Ladlie, who grew up in this area back in the ‘70s, when there was only one blinking red stoplight in the middle of the town. He and his friends used to leave shotguns in the back of their cars so they could go trap-shooting after school.

He told me that “there was a lot more freedom” and “these shootings were the furthest thing from our minds.” His senior class had less than 200 kids, so “it wasn’t as hard to spot the kids with the issues.” Today, having a gun in the school’s parking lot is grounds for expulsion. Troy Buchanan now has secured entrances, security cameras, and magnets on their classroom doors. It’s hard not to notice that these school shootings—and these drills—are an overwhelmingly suburban phenomenon, seemingly spurred by the kind of anonymity, boredom, and isolation you don’t see as much in cities or tiny, tight-knit communities.